Posts about bicv

2017-03-29 testing COMPs-fastPcum_scripted

In this notebook, we will study how homeostasis (cooperation) may be an essential ingredient to this algorithm working on a winner-take-all basis (competition). This extension has been published as Perrinet, Neural Computation (2010) (see http://invibe.net/LaurentPerrinet/Publications/Perrinet10shl ). Compared to the previous post, we integrated the faster code to https://github.com/bicv/SHL_scripts.

See also the other posts on unsupervised learning,

This is joint work with Victor Boutin.

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2017-03-29 testing COMPs-fastPcum

In this notebook, we will study how homeostasis (cooperation) may be an essential ingredient to this algorithm working on a winner-take-all basis (competition). This extension has been published as Perrinet, Neural Computation (2010) (see http://invibe.net/LaurentPerrinet/Publications/Perrinet10shl ). Compared to the previous post, we optimize the code to be faster.

See also the other posts on unsupervised learning,

This is joint work with Victor Boutin.

Read more…

2017-03-29 testing COMPs-Pcum

In this notebook, we will study how homeostasis (cooperation) may be an essential ingredient to this algorithm working on a winner-take-all basis (competition). This extension has been published as Perrinet, Neural Computation (2010) (see http://invibe.net/LaurentPerrinet/Publications/Perrinet10shl ). In particular, we will show how one can build the non-linear functions based on the activity of each filter and which implement homeostasis.

See also the other posts on unsupervised learning,

This is joint work with Victor Boutin.

Read more…

2015-05-22 A hitchhiker guide to Matching Pursuit

The Matching Pursuit algorithm is popular in signal processing and applies well to digital images.

I have contributed a python implementation and we will show here how we may use that for extracting a sparse set of edges from an image.



bibtex
@inbook{Perrinet15bicv,
    title = {Sparse models},
    author = {Perrinet, Laurent U.},
    booktitle = {Biologically-inspired Computer Vision},
    chapter = {13},
    citeulike-article-id = {13566753},
    editor = {Keil, Matthias and Crist\'{o}bal, Gabriel and Perrinet, Laurent U.},
    publisher = {Wiley, New-York},
    year = {2015}
}

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2015-05-21 A simple pre-processing filter for image processing

When processing images, it is useful to avoid artifacts, in particular when you try to understand biological processes. In the past, I have used natural images (found on internet, grabbed from holiday pictures, ...) without controlling for possible problems.

In particular, digital pictures are taken on pixels which are most often placed on a rectangular grid. It means that if you rotate that image, you may lose information and distort it and thus get wrong results (even for the right algorithm!). Moreover, pictures have a border while natural scenes do not, unless you are looking at it through an aperture. Intuitively, this means that large objects would not fit on the screen and are less informative.

In computer vision, it is easier to handle these problems in Fourier space. There, an image (that we suppose square for simplicity) is transformed in a matrix of coefficients of the same size as the image. If you rotate the image, the Fourier spectrum is also rotated. But as you rotate the image, the information that was in the corners of the original spectrum may span outside the spectrum of the rotated image. Also, the information in the center of the spectrum (around low frequencies) is less relevant than the rest.

Here, we will try to keep as much information about the image as possible, while removing the artifacts related to the process of digitalizing the picture.

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